MahaBhart

MahaBhart : The Mahabharata is a major epic of ancient Indian literature, and is considered one of the greatest works of world literature. The epic is believed to have been composed over a period of several centuries, and is estimated to have been written between 400 BCE and 400 CE.

The Mahabharata tells the story of the Bharata dynasty, and is centered around a great war between two branches of the family – the Pandavas and the Kauravas. The Pandavas, led by the heroic warrior prince Arjuna, are the rightful heirs to the throne, but are denied their inheritance by their cousins, the Kauravas. The ensuing war is fought on a grand scale, with the help of powerful gods and divine weapons.

The Mahabharata is not just a tale of war and conflict, but also contains many philosophical and moral teachings. It includes the famous Bhagavad Gita, which is a dialogue between Arjuna and the god Krishna, and is considered a key text of Hinduism. The epic also covers many other topics, such as family relationships, duty, love, friendship, and the role of women in society.

The Mahabharata is an extremely long work, with over 100,000 couplets in its longest version. It has been translated into many languages and has had a profound impact on Indian culture and society. The epic has been adapted into plays, movies, and TV shows, and is still widely read and studied today.

Kurukshetra War Pandavas of Kuru Kingdom Kauravas of Kuru Kingdom Pandavas Victory

Pandavas MahaBhart

The Pandavas are the central characters in the Mahabharata, one of the two main branches of the Bharata dynasty, and the main protagonists of the epic. The five Pandava brothers are Yudhishthira, Bhima, Arjuna, Nakula, and Sahadeva, born to their mother Kunti, and their father Pandu, the king of Hastinapura.

The Pandavas are known for their exceptional qualities, such as their bravery, intelligence, and virtue. They are also skilled warriors and are considered among the greatest warriors of their time. The Pandavas are often contrasted with their cousins, the Kauravas, who are depicted as deceitful and power-hungry.

The story of the Mahabharata revolves around the conflict between the Pandavas and Kauravas, which ultimately leads to the great war at Kurukshetra. The Pandavas, despite being the rightful heirs to the throne, are denied their inheritance by the Kauravas, and are forced to go into exile. During their exile, they undergo many trials and tribulations, but are eventually able to build a powerful army and return to reclaim their kingdom.

Arjuna, the third Pandava brother, is a particularly important character in the Mahabharata. He is a skilled archer and warrior, and is considered the greatest hero of the epic. He is also the protagonist of the Bhagavad Gita, which is considered one of the most important texts of Hinduism. The Gita is a conversation between Arjuna and the god Krishna, where Krishna explains the nature of duty and the importance of detachment and selflessness.

The Pandavas are revered in Indian culture and are considered role models for their virtues and qualities. Their story has been adapted into plays, movies, and TV shows, and is still widely read and studied today.

Arjun MahaBhart

Arjuna is one of the central characters in the Mahabharata, and is considered one of the greatest warriors of his time. He is the third of the five Pandava brothers, born to Kunti and Pandu, the king of Hastinapura.

Arjuna is known for his exceptional skill as an archer and his bravery in battle. He is also regarded as a virtuous and moral character, and is often seen as a symbol of righteousness and duty. Arjuna is particularly close to his cousin Krishna, who serves as his charioteer and mentor throughout the epic.

Arjuna’s story is closely tied to the great war at Kurukshetra, which forms the climax of the Mahabharata. Before the war, Arjuna is overcome with doubts and misgivings about the righteousness of fighting his own kinsmen. In response, Krishna delivers the famous Bhagavad Gita, a conversation that takes place between the two, in which Krishna teaches Arjuna about duty, detachment, and the nature of the self. The Gita is considered one of the most important texts of Hinduism, and has been widely studied and interpreted over the centuries.

During the war, Arjuna plays a crucial role in many of the battles, and is responsible for several important victories. He is particularly known for his skill as an archer, and is capable of shooting arrows with incredible speed and accuracy. He is also involved in many personal conflicts, such as his rivalry with Karna, a powerful warrior who fights on the side of the Kauravas.

Arjuna’s story has been adapted into many different forms of media, including plays, movies, and TV shows. He continues to be a beloved and iconic figure in Indian culture, and is widely regarded as a symbol of virtue, courage, and devotion to duty.

Bhim MahaBhart

Bhima is one of the central characters in the Mahabharata, and is the second of the five Pandava brothers. He is known for his great strength, courage, and love of food. Bhima is often portrayed as a heroic figure, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest warriors of his time.

Bhima’s physical strength is a recurring theme throughout the Mahabharata, and he is often depicted as being capable of superhuman feats. He is also known for his skill as a wrestler, and is able to defeat many opponents in hand-to-hand combat.

Bhima’s story is closely tied to the great war at Kurukshetra, which forms the climax of the Mahabharata. During the war, Bhima is responsible for several important victories, including the killing of many of the Kaurava warriors. He is also involved in several personal conflicts, such as his rivalry with the Kaurava prince Duryodhana.

Despite his great strength, Bhima is also shown to be a compassionate and empathetic character. He is particularly close to his brother Arjuna, and is known for his loyalty and devotion to his family. He is also shown to be a lover of food, and is often depicted as being able to eat enormous quantities of food in a single sitting.

Bhima’s story has been adapted into many different forms of media, including plays, movies, and TV shows. He continues to be a beloved and iconic figure in Indian culture, and is widely regarded as a symbol of strength, courage, and compassion.

Yudhishthira MahaBhart

Yudhishthira is one of the central characters in the Mahabharata, and is the eldest of the five Pandava brothers. He is known for his righteousness, wisdom, and devotion to duty. Yudhishthira is often portrayed as a heroic figure, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest kings of his time.

Yudhishthira’s story is closely tied to the great war at Kurukshetra, which forms the climax of the Mahabharata. During the war, Yudhishthira is responsible for leading the Pandava army, and is shown to be a wise and compassionate leader. He is also involved in several personal conflicts, such as his rivalry with the Kaurava prince Duryodhana.

Yudhishthira’s most famous attribute is his unwavering commitment to truth and righteousness. He is known for his honesty and integrity, and is often called “Dharmaraja,” which means “King of Dharma.” Yudhishthira’s adherence to his principles is put to the test throughout the Mahabharata, particularly in the game of dice with the Kauravas, where he loses his kingdom and his brothers to the Kauravas due to a series of unfair and deceitful moves by his cousin Duryodhana.

Despite his many virtues, Yudhishthira is also shown to have flaws and weaknesses. He is prone to moments of doubt and despair, and his attachment to his family and friends can lead him into difficult situations. However, he always remains committed to his principles and his duty, and is widely regarded as a model of ethical and moral behavior.

Yudhishthira’s story has been adapted into many different forms of media, including plays, movies, and TV shows. He continues to be a beloved and iconic figure in Indian culture, and is widely regarded as a symbol of righteousness, wisdom, and devotion to duty.

Nakula MahaBhart

Nakula is one of the central characters in the Mahabharata, and is the fourth of the five Pandava brothers. He is known for his beauty, intelligence, and skill as a horseman. Nakula is often portrayed as a heroic figure, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest warriors of his time.

Nakula’s story is closely tied to the great war at Kurukshetra, which forms the climax of the Mahabharata. During the war, Nakula is responsible for several important missions, including spying on the Kauravas and leading a crucial charge against their army. He is also involved in several personal conflicts, such as his rivalry with the Kaurava prince Duryodhana.

Nakula’s most famous attribute is his beauty, which is often compared to that of the gods. He is also known for his intelligence and skill as a horseman, and is said to be able to understand the language of animals. Nakula is also shown to be a compassionate and empathetic character, particularly towards animals and those who are suffering.

Despite his many virtues, Nakula is often overshadowed by his more famous brothers, such as Arjuna and Bhima. However, he remains an important character in the Mahabharata, and is widely regarded as a symbol of beauty, intelligence, and compassion.

Nakula’s story has been adapted into many different forms of media, including plays, movies, and TV shows. He continues to be a beloved and iconic figure in Indian culture, and is widely regarded as a symbol of beauty, intelligence, and compassion.

Sahadeva MahaBhart

Sahadeva was one of the five Pandava brothers and a central character in the Indian epic, Mahabharata. He was the youngest of the Pandavas and the twin brother of Nakula. Sahadeva was known for his expertise in astrology and his skills as a warrior.

During the Kurukshetra War, Sahadeva played a crucial role in the Pandava army. He fought bravely in many battles, including the one against Shakuni, the mastermind behind the Kaurava army. Sahadeva was also responsible for slaying Shakuni’s son, Uluka, in the war.

Apart from his martial abilities, Sahadeva was known for his intelligence and wisdom. He was an expert in astrology and was consulted by his brothers and other important figures in the epic for his knowledge. Sahadeva was also a skilled diplomat and was involved in several negotiations throughout the Mahabharata.

Despite being a warrior, Sahadeva was portrayed as a humble and gentle character. He was known for his devotion to his brothers and his duty towards his kingdom. Sahadeva, along with his brothers, played a significant role in the victory of the Pandavas in the Kurukshetra War, which is considered one of the most significant events in Indian mythology.

Shri Krishna Mahabharat

Shri Krishna is one of the most important and revered characters in the Indian epic, Mahabharata. He was the eighth avatar of Lord Vishnu, one of the three major deities in Hinduism. In the Mahabharata, Shri Krishna played a central role as a friend, philosopher, and guide to the Pandavas, who were the protagonists of the epic.

Shri Krishna was born in Mathura to Devaki and Vasudeva, and he spent his childhood in Vrindavan, where he is believed to have performed many miracles and played with his friends. As a young man, Shri Krishna moved to Dwaraka, where he became a king and ruled with wisdom and fairness.

In the Mahabharata, Shri Krishna was a key figure in the Kurukshetra War, which was fought between the Pandavas and the Kauravas. He served as a charioteer and advisor to Arjuna, the third Pandava brother, and imparted the knowledge of the Bhagavad Gita to him before the war. Shri Krishna’s teachings in the Bhagavad Gita, which emphasized the importance of fulfilling one’s duty and surrendering to God, are still revered and followed by millions of people today.

Throughout the Mahabharata, Shri Krishna displayed his divine powers and intervened in the war to protect the Pandavas and uphold dharma, or righteousness. He is also known for his role in reconciling the warring factions after the war ended.

Shri Krishna is regarded as one of the most important deities in Hinduism and is worshipped by millions of people around the world. His life and teachings continue to inspire people to this day, and his influence can be seen in many aspects of Indian culture, including art, literature, and philosophy.

Kauravas MahaBhart

The Kauravas are one of the main branches of the Bharata dynasty, and the main antagonists of the Mahabharata epic. They are the 100 sons of the blind king Dhritarashtra, and their mother is Gandhari. The eldest Kaurava son, Duryodhana, is the main antagonist of the epic.

The Kauravas are portrayed as greedy and power-hungry, and are contrasted with the virtuous and noble Pandavas. Despite being aware of the Pandavas’ rightful claim to the throne, the Kauravas refuse to give up their power and wealth, and constantly plot against their cousins.

The story of the Mahabharata revolves around the conflict between the Kauravas and the Pandavas, which ultimately leads to the great war at Kurukshetra. The Kauravas are portrayed as being responsible for much of the suffering and violence that occurs during the epic, and are ultimately defeated in the war.

Duryodhana, the eldest Kaurava, is a particularly important character in the Mahabharata. He is shown to be arrogant, cruel, and envious of the Pandavas, and is willing to do whatever it takes to maintain his power and wealth. Despite his negative qualities, he is also depicted as being brave and loyal to his family.

The Kauravas are often seen as a symbol of evil in Indian culture, and their actions are often used as cautionary tales. The epic has been adapted into many different forms of media, and the Kauravas continue to be a prominent part of Indian cultural heritage.

Duryodhan mahabharat

Duryodhan was one of the central characters in the Indian epic, Mahabharata. He was the eldest of the Kaurava brothers and the main antagonist of the epic. Duryodhan’s character was portrayed as ambitious, cunning, and power-hungry, and his actions throughout the epic led to the Kurukshetra War, one of the bloodiest conflicts in Indian mythology.

Duryodhan’s animosity towards the Pandavas, who were his cousins, was fueled by his jealousy of their wealth, power, and popularity. He was particularly envious of the Pandava prince, Yudhishthira, who was loved and respected by all. Duryodhan’s attempts to humiliate and harm the Pandavas eventually led to the events that precipitated the war.

During the Kurukshetra War, Duryodhan fought fiercely against the Pandavas, and his warriors displayed great valor in battle. However, Duryodhan’s arrogance and disregard for dharma, or righteousness, ultimately led to his downfall. He was slain in a duel with Bhima, the second Pandava brother, who had sworn to avenge the injustices inflicted upon his family.

Despite his negative portrayal in the epic, Duryodhan is often seen as a tragic figure, whose downfall was brought about by his own flaws and mistakes. His character serves as a cautionary tale, warning against the dangers of greed, envy, and hubris. Duryodhan’s actions and their consequences continue to be studied and debated by scholars, and his story remains an important part of Indian mythology and culture.

Karan Mahabharat

Karna, also known as Karan, was one of the most complex and fascinating characters in the Indian epic, Mahabharata. He was the son of Kunti, the mother of the Pandavas, and the sun god Surya. However, he was raised by a charioteer and was not aware of his true identity until later in life.

Karna was a skilled warrior and a loyal friend, but his life was marked by tragedy and misfortune. He was shunned by many because of his low birth, and he suffered from a lack of recognition and respect. Despite his many virtues, Karna was often misunderstood and mistreated by those around him, including his own family.

Karna’s loyalty was tested when he was asked to join the Kaurava army, which was led by Duryodhana, his best friend. Despite knowing that the Pandavas were his brothers, Karna decided to fight against them, believing that his loyalty to Duryodhana and his sense of honor demanded it.

During the Kurukshetra War, Karna displayed great courage and prowess in battle, and he was responsible for killing many notable warriors. However, he was ultimately defeated and killed by Arjuna, the third Pandava brother, in a duel that has become one of the most iconic moments in Indian mythology.

Karna’s tragic story has made him a beloved and revered figure in Indian culture. He is seen as a symbol of the struggle against social injustice and discrimination, and his character serves as a reminder of the importance of loyalty, honor, and compassion.

Bhishama Mahabharat

Bhishma, also known as Bhishama or Bhishma Pitamah, was one of the most respected and revered characters in the Indian epic, Mahabharata. He was the son of King Shantanu and Ganga, and he was known for his wisdom, integrity, and unwavering commitment to duty.

Bhishma played a pivotal role in the epic, serving as the patriarch of the Kuru family and as a mentor to the Pandavas and Kauravas. He was renowned for his martial prowess and his knowledge of dharma, or righteous conduct, and he was respected by all who knew him.

Despite his many virtues, Bhishma was also a tragic figure, whose life was marked by personal sacrifice and inner turmoil. He had taken a vow of celibacy, which prevented him from marrying and having children, and this decision caused him great pain and loneliness.

During the Kurukshetra War, Bhishma fought on the side of the Kauravas, despite his deep affection for the Pandavas. He believed that his loyalty to his family and his sense of duty required him to fight against the Pandavas, even though he knew that they were in the right.

Bhishma’s role in the war was crucial, and he was responsible for some of the most memorable moments in the epic, including his vow to remain on a bed of arrows until the end of the war. He was ultimately defeated by Arjuna, the third Pandava brother, but his valor and sacrifice made him a beloved and revered figure in Indian mythology.

Bhishma’s character serves as a reminder of the importance of duty, sacrifice, and honor, and his story continues to inspire and captivate audiences around the world.

Guru Dronacharya Mahabharat

Dronacharya, also known as Guru Drona, was a prominent character in the Indian epic, Mahabharata. He was a respected warrior, teacher, and mentor, and he played a crucial role in the education and training of the Kuru princes, including the Pandavas and Kauravas.

Dronacharya was renowned for his skill in archery and other martial arts, and his expertise was sought by many kings and princes. He was considered one of the most learned and respected gurus of his time, and his students included some of the greatest warriors in Indian mythology.

Despite his many virtues, Dronacharya’s character was also marked by his personal loyalty and his attachment to his students. He had a deep affection for the Kuru princes, particularly his favorite student, the Kaurava prince, Duryodhana.

Dronacharya’s role in the Kurukshetra War was complex and controversial. He fought on the side of the Kauravas, believing that his loyalty to his students required him to do so. However, his actions in the war, particularly his role in the death of the Pandava prince, Abhimanyu, have been the subject of much debate and criticism.

Dronacharya’s tragic death is one of the most memorable moments in the epic. He was tricked into believing that his beloved son, Ashwatthama, had been killed in battle, and he lost the will to fight. He was then slain by the Pandava prince, Dhristadyumna, in a moment that is seen as a symbol of the devastating impact of personal attachments and loyalties.

Dronacharya’s character serves as a reminder of the importance of education, discipline, and loyalty, as well as the dangers of personal attachments and biases. His story continues to be studied and debated by scholars and readers around the world.

Dharmendra Singh

Learn More →